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Send email to newsaero@ipcmedia.com Open www.aeroplanemonthly.com Open www.aeroplanemonthly.com Call +442031484104 Look up postcode SE1 0SU click to zoom in Go to page 28 click to zoom in
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News

Tel: 020 3148 4104 E-mail: newsaero@ipcmedia.com

Write: Aeroplane, Blue Fin Building, Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU

For more news and extras go to: www.aeroplanemonthly.com

Scott’s record-setting Moth to fl y

RESTORATION PROJECT

THE DE HAVILLAND D.H.60 Moth in which pioneering pilot Charles W.A. Scott set a new England—Australia record in 1931 is now in an advanced state of restoration at Caboolture airfi eld in Queensland, Australia. The wings were recently trial-fi tted at the workshops of Sandora Aviation, where work is being done for the Moth’s owner, Ted Field. A zero-time 120 h.p. Gipsy II engine, similar to that originally fi tted to the metal-fuselaged D.H.60M in March 1931, is awaiting installation.

In early 1931 C.W.A. Scott, a British pilot working as a fl ying instructor in Brisbane, had been asked to return to England to buy a Moth and deliver it to an Australian customer, R.S. White. He

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acquired D.H.60M c/n 1685, which was registered G-ABHY in March 1931, and modifi ed it to carry 103gal of fuel and 3gal of oil, permitting 16hr endurance.

Scott set off from Lympne, Kent, in the early hours of April 1, fl ying non-stop to Belgrade. On April 10, nine days, 4hr and 10min after setting out, he arrived

in Darwin, having fl own many of the legs to the limit of the Moth’s endurance, and made several night landings.

The Moth fl ew as VH-UQH until it was written off in north-western Australia in March 1953, after which the damaged machine spent several decades in storage.

ABOVE The Moth at Caboolture. LEFT Scott with the Moth in April 1931. He went on to win the 1934 MacRobertson Air Race in D.H. Comet G-ACSS.

Antiques Roadshow for Brooklands Museum

Antiques Roadshow for Brooklands Museum

A BUSY SPRINGTIME at the Brooklands Museum in Surrey will culminate in a visit from BBC TV’s Antiques Roadshow on May 31. Museum staff are hoping that the pulling power of such a popular programme may see some rare aviation artefacts being unearthed for the delectation of the BBC’s panel of experts.

may see some rare aviation artefacts being unearthed

received a £10,000 Renais-

The museum recently received a £10,000 Renaissance South East Large Grant funded by MLA Council’s Renaissance programme to buy new scaffolding towers and

accessories to assist with the maintenance of aircraft on external display. On Easter Monday more than 1,000 people visited the museum’s “Magnifi cent Men And Our Flying Machines” day, including former Hawker test pilots.

former Hawker test pilots.

B R O O K L A N D S M U S E U M

LEFT front of Brooklands’ Clubhouse for Easter. of Viscount XT575 was moved to the museum’s Vickers Aircraft Park.

LEFT The recently-restored fuselage of Vickers Viking G-AGRU was put in front of Brooklands’ Clubhouse for Easter. ABOVE On March 25 the nose of Viscount XT575 was moved to the museum’s Vickers Aircraft Park.

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Question of the month Given the renaissance in World War One interest, would you like to see more on that subject in Aeroplane? VOTE ONLINE: www.aeroplanemonthly.com

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Our latest poll asked: “Would you like more preservation coverage in Aeroplane, even if it is at the expense of a history feature or two?”

YES: 51% NO: 49%

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AEROPLANE JUNE 2009 “The machine was covered with ice, and it continually became necessary

to chip ice off the instruments . . .” Lt A. W. Brown on a major feat of navigation, Aircrew Page 28

I A M A R K S H E P PA R D

P H O TO G R A P H S V

Kills found on P-47D

Kills found on P-47D

HISTORY REDISCOVERED

AT CALDWELL, IDAHO, USA, Republic P-47D 42-29150 Dottie Mae is currently being stripped down in the workshops of Vintage Airframes (VA) before restoration to fl y for new owner Jack Croul. Recovered from Austria’s Traunsee lake in June 2005, the “Jug” was the last combat mission loss of the European war, and is the only surviving P-47 with a European Theatre combat history.

On April 4, VA boss Mike Breshear was gently cleaning the fuselage when he discovered two unexpected victory

markings under the build-up of calcium deposits on the nose. To the left of the markings there are also faint pencil marks indicating another victory recorded before Dottie Mae took off on May 8, 1945, for its 90th — and last — mission (see News Feature, November 2005 Aeroplane).

deposits on the nose. To the left of the markings there are also

All of the metalwork on this sympathetic restoration will be undertaken by VA, before the fi ghter is sent to P-47 specialists Westpac in Colorado, who will complete the systems and certifi cation.

ABOVE The two

ABOVE The two victory markings on Dottie Mae. TOP The fuselage outside the Vintage Airframes workshop. All original parts that can be safely reused will be retained on the fi nished fi ghter.

Reclusive Mustang emerges

PETALUMA P-51

I K E S H R E E V E

M

AFTER TWO DECADES hidden away at Petaluma, in California’s Sonoma valley, George Perez’s North American P-51D N51GP/44-74483 has been reactivated and arrived at its new base at nearby Schellville in late March, left. Perez has owned the P-51 for 43 years!

Junkers replica stars at Friedrichshafen

GOOD PROGRESS IS being made on the Junkers-F 13 replica, right, being built by enthusiasts at the Technikmuseum Hugo Junkers at Dessau. The fuselage frame, tailplane, centre-section and undercarriage were shown at Aero 2009 Friedrichshafen in early April. The wooden propeller is also original, but, while the engine appears old, it is actually a dummy. The builders are working to original specifi cations and original Junkers drawings, and hope to complete the airliner within two years. First fl own on June 25, 1919, the F 13 was the world’s fi rst all-metal transport aircraft.

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The Museum of Flight at East Fortune, Scotland. On April 10 a £2m investment in new displays came to frution with the opening of two new exhibitions, Fantastic Flight and East Fortune at War,

left. Both exhibitions contain state-ofthe-art interactive exhibits, including displays focusing on the recordsetting R34

airship at East Fortune, personal reminiscences of Beaufi ghter crews at the base, and 1960s aviatrix Sheila Scott.

The Canadian Warplane Heritage at Hamilton, Ontario. A freshly-restored North American BT-14 Yale, RCAF 3400/N129DB, has been donated to the organisation by restorer Ron Rhodes. The Yale is expected to be fl own to Hamilton in early May.

Month Month Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good

Bad Month Bad Month

Stampe SV-4 G-BEPC. On April 5 at Goodwood, after the pilot had swung the propeller, the Stampe ran away, described a series of circles before taking off unaided and crashing into trees on the airfi eld’s perimeter. Although it was substantially damaged, vigilant staff soon had it foamed down.

The Commemorative Air Force (CAF) at Midland, Texas, USA. Martin AM-1 Mauler BuNo 122260 and an incomplete example, BuNo 122401, recently left Midland after their reallocation by the US Navy to the Glenn L. Martin Museum at Middle River, Maryland. Mauler 122260 was restored to fl ying condition by the CAF in the early 1980s, but was seriously damaged in an accident in 1984. It is thought that a recent attempt to initiate another airworthy restoration has precipitated the Navy’s actions to reposess the rare late-1940s Pratt & Whitney R-4360 Wasp Major-powered shipboard attack aircraft.

AEROPLANE JUNE 2009

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