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British Archaeology

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Latest issue:

There are some prominent women in this issue. Stonehenge is shown in reconstructions as a place where (often half-naked) men shout at each other. There are more than stones at Stonehenge, however. It was the country’s largest prehistoric cremation cemetery – and new research shows half those buried there were women: Stonehenge was not just a man thing. There may be the remains of a woman in “Britain’s Pompeii” – the extraordinarily preserved bronze age house at Must Farm. And it is thanks to a woman that Mucking was excavated – a place of archaeological myth and eccentricity that after 50 years is now offering a unique insight into Britain’s long-term history. With features about Rome’s port, TV archaeology in the 1960s and neolithic houses in Wales – extremely rare, then three came along at once – and more, this is another unmatched tour through the best stories in British archaeology.



Love archaeology?

British Archaeology the UK's most talked about archaeology magazine will suit anyone with a passion for delving into our past - whether you enjoy watching the latest archaeological TV documentaries, visiting historic buildings or digging on ancient sites!

It is an authoritative, in-depth source of information and comment on what’s new, interesting and important in the world of archaeology.

British Archaeology is a bi-monthly publication from the Council for British Archaeology – an educational charity. The established voice for archaeology in the UK, we're here to help you discover, explore and protect our unique heritage.

Among the articles in the trial issue, Mike Pitts reflects on the challenges facing the modern archaeologist, Jim Leary and David Field investigate traces of neolithic religion around Wiltshire's rivers and Sebastian Payne ponders the importance of the scientific side of archaeology.


Books are regularly reviewed in each issue of the magazine while the humorous 'Spoilheap' column keeps tabs on the curious lives of archaeologists. The 'Briefing' section lists the latest fieldwork excursions, excavations and archaeological conferences to keep readers in touch with the CBA network.

If you have an iPad or iPhone you can read the latest issue as well as the extensive archive via the British Archaeology app.
Find this by searching the App Store for British Archaeology or by clicking here.

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For full access, just log in with your Exact Editions username and password when prompted by the app.

All subscribers will gain access to all 35 issues:

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