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Early Days: 1876‒77 to 1882

sentative team wholly composed of gentlemen. That proviso it was found necessary to act upon. Morley was asked, but declined to go; and the two professionals selected were George Ulyett and Thomas Emmett. The long illness, and subsequent death, of the brother of Mr I. D. Walker prevented that gentleman becoming one of the team. Lord Harris kindly undertook the management.

The main body of this little cricketing army of England’s – strong in batsmen and fieldsmen, but weak in slow bowling and wicket-keeping – left Southampton in the P&O SSAustralia on October 17, 1878. On the midnight of Monday, December 2, they were met at the bay by the Adelaide reception committee, and three gentlemen from Melbourne – representatives of the Melbourne Cricket Club, whose guests the Englishmen were. A four-in-hand drag took them to Adelaide that night, and on the following morning the Mayor of Adelaide gave them a most hearty welcome.

A private Assembly Ball in honour of the Englishmen was held in the Town Hall on December 11, at which Lady Jervois, His Excellency the Governor Sir William Jervois, and about 300other ladies and gentlemen were present. The team had almost daily practice up to the 12th, on which day they got into full cricketing harness, and commenced their first match.

Only Test At Melbourne, January 2, 3, 4, 1879. Australia won by ten wickets.

The ground was largely attended, 7,000being present before the day was out. His Excellency the Governor and Lady Bowen were among the company who filled every place of vantage for witnessing the match. Lord Harris won choice, and, after due thought, chose his side should bat, but his decision had hardly been given when rain fell freely for a short period. Mr Lucas and Ulyett commenced the batting; and unfortunately the second ball Ulyett played on before a run was scored. With the score at six Mr Webbe was bowled; at ten Mr Lucas was bowled; and at 14Mr Hornby was bowled.

Lord Harris stayed well, but when Mr Royle had made three singles, Spofforth’s bowling captured three wickets with three successive balls – the victims being Mr Royle, Mr Mackinnon and Emmett, seven wickets being then down for 26runs. Mr Absolom was next in; he forthwith played his old, old game of knocking the ball all over the ground, and with Lord Harris, increased the score to 89, when Garrett bowled his lordship for 33– a good innings. Mr Absolom continued hitting hard for the honour of the old land, until a capital catch at long field by A. Bannerman closed his score for 52, and England’s innings for 113, Spofforth’s bowling having taken six wickets for 48runs.

Charles Bannerman and Murdoch began the Australian batting to the bowling of Ulyett and Emmett. Bannerman was out for 15; and when 37had been scored Horan was had at wicket. Then A. Bannerman and Spofforth got together; Bannerman was missed by Mr Hone at wicket before he had made a run, and Ulyett missed both batsmen, so they stayed together until time was called, the score then standing at 93. (One of the team wrote home: “I have seen more mistakes in Melbourne than I expected to see in the time we were out. I can only account for it in the strong light here, the sky being so deep a blue that it dazzles our eyes, and you cannot judge a catch at all.”)

Next day at noon the match was resumed, and when Spofforth had increased

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